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Embedded Camera-Eye

Posted by on Jul 10, 2011 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Emerging Science and Technology, Geolocation and Psychogeography | Comments Off on Embedded Camera-Eye

After losing an eye in a car accident, Tanya Vlach is trying to raise money to have a webcam fashioned like an eye installed in the non-functional eye socket. The prosthetic camera-eye is designed to be waterproof, capable of wireless HD video transmission at 720p, and will include zoom and still-capture features, activated by blinking. On Vlach’s wishlist for the eye — expected to cost at least $15,000 to design and embed — is facial recognition, geotagging, and infrared viewing.

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BMW Puts Its Logo On The Back of Eyelids

Posted by on Jan 2, 2011 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Media and Markets | Comments Off on BMW Puts Its Logo On The Back of Eyelids

“Persistence of vision” is a phenomenon that allows our eyes to experience a continuous moving picture when confronted with a series of still images or frames that pass by in a fast sequence.?? Recently,? experiments on “closed eye visualization” have been used for advertising purposes,? as when BMW’s Dutch ad group flashed the BMW logo in a dark movie theater,? then asked the audience to close their eyes so they could experience the residual “retinal noise” — a bright spot at the back of the eyelid.

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We’re watching

Posted by on Oct 18, 2008 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Data Visualization, Emerging Science and Technology, Geolocation and Psychogeography, Media and Markets, Technology and Privacy | Comments Off on We’re watching

A Canadian company has developed a technology called Eyebox2 that it says can monitor the gaze of passersby and respond to shifts in attention,  even tracking multiple people at once,  and even from more than 30 feet away.

The company says the advertising potential is large, wherein outdoor or unconventional ad space could be sold "by the eyeball." In addition, the technology could provide a new kind of test lab for evaluating and refining ads in unusual contexts.

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Biometric + Digital Art at Venice Biennale

Posted by on Jun 1, 2007 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Emerging Science and Technology, Technology and Art, Technology and Privacy | Comments Off on Biometric + Digital Art at Venice Biennale

Didn’t make it to the Venice Biennale, but if I were there, I wouldn’t want to miss the installation by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer called “Pulse Room.” 100 lightbulbs are connected to EKG sensors and thus are “controlled by the heartbeat of the public.” ? The exhibit runs from June 10 – November 21 (2007) in the Palazzo Van Axel.

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Imagining an entirely re-made human….

Posted by on Jul 19, 2006 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Emerging Science and Technology | Comments Off on Imagining an entirely re-made human….

What has six limbs, a prehensile tail, its brain in its chest, and reproductive organs in its mouth? The alternate human designed by biologist PZ Myers in Remaking Humanity, a story in Forbes.com’s?series on Reinvention. It may sound like pure science fiction, but researchers are already working to re-build DNA, proteins and cells in a new field called synthetic biology, and some believe that its first live specimens will be built within the next few decades.

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Getting Tagged

Posted by on Feb 18, 2006 in Bioreactive Media, Blog, Emerging Science and Technology, Geolocation and Psychogeography, Media and Markets, Technology and Art, Technology and Privacy | Comments Off on Getting Tagged

RFID implants in humans are no longer mere science fiction. At least 30 individuals have received RFID chip implants and have even established an online forum to discuss the philosophical implications… and the methods associated with implantation.

Uses of the implants vary from controlling locks on home and automobile entrances to security for computer equipment, although the functionality will certainly expand with the trend, which is known as “getting tagged.”

While cyborgian-style implants have been an underground trend for several years — including having radio receivers implanted in molars, and celphone headsets implanted in ear canals — RFID implants open up a number of disturbing questions beyond those raised by these earlier trends. Developments such as the new requirement that all U.S. passports contain RFID suggest a future where all citizens are ultimately tracked and trackable. A New York Times article pointed out today that national governments could require RFID implants for residents within its borders, employers prefer to hire implanted-workers, and insurance companies could refuse to insure the un-trackable (and thus unsecured) person. In the current “security” climate it is not too difficult to see this kind of thing happening, and not too far off into the future. Implantees now think the chips are cool and convenient…. but what if everybody had to have them, by law? I doubt they would be seen as cool by the cyborgian subculture — or anyone else — by then. Of course univeral RFID implants would be a great boon to relationship marketing, media targeting, and other messaging efforts by media and marketers. In audience/media research, a solution has been sought for decades now to adequately track exposure to media that takes place outside the tethered confines of the home or office. RFID has been discussed for about 15 years now as one possible answer to that problem. Cheap RFID receivers could be placed in thousands of locations around cities, in retail locations, and even in vehicles… and tracking portable media and place-based media exposure is a done deal.

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